Sky Valley Zip Tours

Your Canopy Adventure Awaits

 

5 min. from Boone/Blowing Rock

 

 10 zip lines, a swinging bridge,

a cliff jump, and countless views

 

Click ad for reservations!

855-475-9947

Stepping Stone of Boone

&

High Country

Community Health

 

  PRESCRIPTION SUBUTEX

NOW AVAILABLE

Call today to learn how

our sliding fee scale can help

make treament more affordable!

 

 More details or to schedule

an intake appointment call:

  828.265.7078

 

Stepping Stone of Boone:

A New Approach to 

Addiction Therapy

Put the TREAT back in

RETREAT!

Laurel Ridge Camp &

Conference Center invites

groups of all kinds to use our

beautiful lodging facilities for

your next retreat.  Visit our

website or contact our office to

make a reservation today!

laurelridge.org

Boone Coin &

SilverWorks

 

Local rare coin &

currency dealer

 

Friendly

Professional

Discreet

 

We buy, sell, and appraise.

Thanks!  -Crae

 

(828) 355-9311

boonesilverworks.com

Cornerstone Christian

Fellowship

CCF is a church family that

believes that God is alive and

He cares about you! Come see

what all the talk is about. We

are located 1/2 mile south of

Grandview Funeral Home at

1276 Grandview Dr. Everyone

is welcome & dress is casual.


Life Outdoors
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That's Why It's Called a Floodplain!
by National Committee for the New River

Latest Update: April 15, 2010


Along the New River this winter, many landowners saw and felt the results of major winter storms and extended periods of sub-freezing temperatures. In many areas, the river froze in layers of thick ice. Simultaneous events of moderating temperatures and heavy rain caused the river to rise and the ice to crack, forming huge ice floes. The rising waters carried the ice floes up onto the floodplain, the natural area for high-water levels to gravitate. You may remember seeing pictures of this phenomenon on Ray's Weather's Photo of the Day this winter. Contrary to popular belief, flooding is a very good thing for the river to do. This winter the floodplains were doing the important work of allowing the water from snow melt, ice melt, and rain to flow up and out of the river banks, dispersing the energy of that tremendous amount of water entering the watershed. Floodplains hold large quantities of water, which slows the flow of water. They allow the sediment carried by the water to settle out on land where it is needed, instead of in the river. Native plants in the floodplain filter pollutants and chemicals from the water, improving water quality for both humans and wildlife. The water held on floodplains also allows the groundwater to recharge, keeping the water in the area to supply streams and wells. In some cases, flood waters and ice damaged the vegetation along the river but the river banks themselves remain mostly unchanged. This is NOT the time to take advantage of cleared banks and start a lawn to the river. The shrubs, grasses, and trees on the river bank are the important riparian buffer that prevents erosion, absorbs pollutants in stormwater runoff, shades the river to keep it cool for fish, and provides food for wildlife, among other things. Landowners should know that while the vegetation itself was sheared off or flattened, the root systems in most cases remain intact. Inaction is the best action as the root mass in the banks will send up new growth this spring for both grasses and wildflowers and the native shrubs. Mother Nature has used this winter weather to remind us of the importance of floodplains and riparian buffers. All of the snow and ice has replenished the water tables and the flooding will provide nutrients and water for spring growth and rebirth. Just sit back and enjoy the show!